Happiness and Difficult Moments

I’ve written a few posts about making difficult times work for us but perhaps it’s even more meaningful coming from someone who has a few years on me. Rita Levi-Montalcini lived to be 103 and worked as a neurologist until shortly before her death. She earned several significant awards, among them the Nobel Prize in Medicine for her work with nerve growth factor. She was a Jewish woman in the world of science during WWII. Politics barred her from academia for almost a decade as soon as she got her medical degree. She escaped German occupation of Italy. She made her most amazing discovery in a home laboratory before she was allowed to re-enter the workforce. This woman knew struggle and hardship. Here is what she said about it in her older years: “Above all, don’t fear difficult moments. The best comes from them.” She has also said, “If I had not been discriminated against or had not suffered persecution, I would never have received the Nobel Prize.” Imagine if you could view all hard times as growth opportunities? There would be less negative anticipation, less fear, less regret and resentment. And more long-term happiness.